Automatically switch proxies in Firefox’s Private Browsing mode – Ghacks Technology News

By Martin Brinkmann on May 21, 2015 in Firefox - Last Update: May 21, 2015 6

Private browsing sessions are handy if you don't want certain activities to be recorded on the local system. While there are still traces on the local system if you dig deep enough -- the DNS cache for instance may reveal which sites you have opened -- there are also remote traces that you need to take into consideration.

One option to deal with those is to use a proxy or VPN whenever you activate the private browsing mode. While there is no such option available for connecting to virtual private networks automatically when you enter Firefox's private browsing mode, it is possible to configure Firefox to connect to a specific proxy server automatically when you load the mode.

Private Browsing Proxy is a browser add-on for Firefox that provides you with those capabilities. It connects to proxy servers automatically whenever you load a private browsing mode window so that it is used instead of the regular connection (or proxy).

firefox private browsing proxy

The extension adds an icon to Firefox's main toolbar which displays a configuration screen on activation.

It enables you to add the following proxies for use in the browser's private browsing mode: HTTP, SSL, FTP, Socks v4, Socks v5.

You may also add an auto-url (proxy auto-config url) instead of specifying proxy servers and IP addresses manually.

The proxy information that you enter in the configuration window are used automatically by the add-on whenever you launch a new private browsing window in Firefox.

It switches to the proxy as soon as a new private browsing window is created and switches back to the original proxy settings (either a different proxy or direct connection based on Firefox's configuration) when the private browsing session is closed again.

proxy notification

The extension displays notifications whenever proxy settings are changed. You find those in the lower right corner of the screen (not necessarily the browser window).

The extension has two limitations currently. While it works fine when you start a new private browsing window, it is not compatible with the private tabs add-on. The second limitation is that it cannot detect if you have configured Firefox to run in private browsing mode by default.

The latter should not be that much of an issue as you can configure proxy servers accordingly in this case then.

Verdict

Private Browsing Proxy is a useful add-on for Firefox users who use the browser's private browsing mode regularly and want to improve privacy remotely as well. The add-on is easy to set up and works automatically after setup.

SummaryAuthor Rating 4Software Name Private Browsing ProxyLanding Page https://addons.mozilla.org/firefox/addon/private-browsing-proxy/ Related Articles

How to always load sites in private browsing mode in Firefox Limit Firefox’s private browsing mode to one window and add other options to it Open Links in Private Browsing Mode In Firefox
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About Martin Brinkmann Martin Brinkmann is a journalist from Germany who founded Ghacks Technology News Back in 2005. He is passionate about all things tech and knows the Internet and computers like the back of his hand. You can follow Martin on Facebook, Twitter or Google+ View all posts by Martin Brinkmann →

Filed under: Firefox add-ons


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Meet The Adblock Browser For Android, A Leap Up From Adblock Plus – Tech News Today

At times, a part of our online time spent on browsing revolves around dodging online popup ads, which are incessantly annoying. We turn to the aid of ad blockers or use proxies to bypass them on our web browsers and a lot of us would be happily using the Adblock Plus extension for browsers. However, things take a downturn when we move toward mobile devices.

Blocking ads is not a piece of cake on our devices and Eyeo, the company behind Adblock Plus, understands that and has released the Adblock Browser for Android. Previously, users had to download the add-on for Mozilla Firefox on their Android devices or install the separate app, but there have been a lot of complications, some involve rooting the device or working via a proxy.

The new browser is a complete game changer for Android users as it will not just block ads automatically, but also help in extending a user’s battery life and stop adware in its tracks. Installing the app does not require Android users to have a rooted device anymore and it’s a simple opt in procedure. The Adblock Browser is in its beta mode, therefore, the company is inviting users to apply to receive the browser via its Google+ community.

The features of this new browser include automatic ad blocking and filtering as well. Most websites rely on ads as their bread and butter to function daily. Some try to present ads in a civilized manner and other just bombard you with ads that push you to the edge of blocking them altogether. Well, the Adblock browser provides you with an option to allow such nonintrusive ads. The settings menu will encourage you to run Acceptable ads.

According to its press report, Adblock Plus claims that 23% battery is consumed because of ads that slow down web browsing. Blocking them speeds up the process and reduces the battery drain, and the Adblock browser will do just that. Adblock Plus claims that its extension has been downloaded over 400 million times; however, all is not merry in the land of ad blocking. Giants such as Google, Microsoft, and Amazon are tired of ad blocking because it cuts deep into their revenue streams. It is believed that these companies maybe in the process of figuring out a way to circumvent such ad blockers in the future.

How to easily secure your web browsing with TunnelBear’s free Chrome extension – PCWorld

Virtual private networks are already easy to use thanks to the simple desktop apps many services offer. But if you live most of your computing life in the browser even a desktop app might be overkill.

Instead, you could use a Chrome extension instead of a desktop app. VPN provider Tunnel Bear, my personal VPN of choice, recently dropped the beta tag from its Chrome extension and made it available as an official stable release.

The extension works with Chrome on Windows, Mac, Linux, and Chrome OS. TunnelBear's one of the few popular VPN providers with an official Chrome extension—CyberGhost being the other.

Although they come from VPN providers, neither of these extensions create a VPN connection for your browser. Instead, they use an encrypted proxy, which is a slightly different technology that achieves the same goal as a VPN: encrypted, safe browsing.

We’ve talked about the importance of virtual private networks before. They're a great tool for protecting your browsing on an open Wi-Fi network or defeating regional restrictions when you need to.

If you live in Chrome, here’s how to secure your web browser without affecting the rest of your system.

To get started, download the TunnelBear extension from the Chrome Web Store. It still says beta in the store, but this is the official release.

Once it’s installed, you’ll see a TunnelBear icon appear to the right of Chrome's address bar, along with all your other extensions.

TunnelBear should start up right away and a new tab will open letting you know you can start your “bear-owsing”—this company has yet to meet a bear pun it didn’t like.

tunnelbeardropdown

TunnelBear for Chrome’s dropdown interface.

Once that’s done, you’re good to go. If you're a TunnelBear paying user (like me) you can click on the extension’s icon, hit the settings cog in the upper right corner, and sign-in to your account.

By default, TunnelBear connects you to a VPN server in the U.S., but you can change that in the main dropdown interface.

If you ever want to turn off TunnelBear, just click the on/off slider at the top of the dropdown.

If you’re a subscriber, TunnelBear’s Chrome extension gives you the same usage rights as the desktop apps. The same goes for free users, which means you only get 500 megabytes of protected browsing in the Chrome extension. That’s enough for some casual email or web browsing, but as soon as you start streaming video that limit will get eaten up pretty quickly.

Those are the basics of TunnelBear for Chrome. Just remember the extension covers only your regular browsing. It won’t work with desktop apps like Sling TV or other browsers. TunnelBear also won’t affect your browsing when in incognito mode since Google doesn’t allow extensions to function in the stealth browser window.

If you do need a VPN to cover more than just your web browsing then a service with a desktop app is a better choice.

Facebook’s new Instant Articles feature means people will spend even more time … – PC Pro

Facebook has unveiled Instant Articles, a new mobile content platform designed to keep users penned inside its social media app by removing the need to leave the site to read articles.

A direct descendant of Facebook Paper, a mobile app briefly available in the US, Instant Articles integrates content from publishers directly onto your newsfeed - cutting loading times and making them even easier to access. According to the social media giant “stories take an average of eight seconds to load, by far the slowest single content type on Facebook. Instant Articles makes the reading experience as much as ten times faster than standard mobile web articles.” But it’s not just speed that makes the new platform interesting.

Interactive content

By loading natively in Facebook’s app, the articles - at present, only from selected publishers including The New York Times, the Guardian, Buzzfeed, the BBC and more - not only appear faster, but should be more interactive. Facebook says it’ll be possible to explore interactive maps and photos, and cool features like parallax have also been promised. The app will be available for iPhone immediately, but it’s almost certain that an Android, Windows Phone and web-based version is on the way.

According to Chief Product Officer Chris Cox, Facebook’s new platform “enables publishers to provide a better experience for their readers on Facebook”, but it’s also another example of Facebook controlling content and browsing habits.

Facebook already has probably the biggest pool of data on each of its users of any company,, and by keeping them within its app ecosystem for longer, it gains even more data and advertising clout. Up till now, online ads have been dominated by Google, but as the proportion of ads sold on mobile has grown, Facebook has become more powerful.

What’s in it for publishers?

Given that Facebook has become a massive source of traffic for online publishers – some sites get up to 70% of their traffic (and thus ultimately revenue) from the social network – it’s hard to understand what’s in it for publishers. The answer is, potentially, even more money: Facebook is offering to give publishers 100% of the revenue for ad slots the publisher sells. And any ad inventory which the publisher can’t sell can be sold by Facebook, which takes a cut.

The big, unanswered question is whether these ad rates can prove to deliver more revenue than the publisher’s own websites. Most websites carry multiple ads per page; Facebook is likely to show only one per article. However, many publishers also struggle to get decent rates for mobile sales, and Facebook may prove to simply be better at selling mobile ads than many publishers’ own ad sales teams.

Internet.org and the issue of net neutrality

The release of the app comes after news that Facebook is taking on Google by testing something which looks remarkably like a search engine, in a move which may further herd users to Facebook’s prefered (or “algorithmically selected”) content. And then there’s internet.org, a partnership designed to deliver low-cost Internet access to the developing world which has been criticised for potentially violating the principle of net neutrality by favouring Facebook services, and even characterised as “simply a Facebook proxy targeting India’s poor”. Although users believe they’re on the internet, it’s been reported to be Facebook and a few hand-picked sites.

Facebook is well aware of its issues with net neutrality, which is probably why the social media giant has prepared a preemptive defense by hiring former FCC chairman Kevin Martin. A key figure in Comcast’s battle with net-neutrality, Kevin Martin’s hiring represents Facebook bringing in somebody that already knows their way around the touchy topic - albeit from the other side of the fence.

Put together Facebook’s existing dominance of social media, the potential of content simply living on Facebook rather than publisher’s sites, and Facebook-biased Internet access, and you have an interesting recipe for what amounts to Facebook becoming the Internet for millions of people. And that raises some big questions about the entire future of the ne

Plug-ins add security your web browser – Sydney Morning Herald

The lock symbol shows your security is working.

The lock symbol shows your security is working.

Even if you've got nothing to hide, you can tighten your internet privacy and security with some simple precautions.

All browsers have built-in security features but Chrome and Firefox are good because you can lock them down using a wide range of plug-ins designed to enhance privacy, security and anonymity.

Plug-ins are small software downloads that add extra features to your browser, but use them sparingly, warns AVG security awareness director Michael McKinnon.

"The more extensions, plug-ins and add-ons you use in your browser, the more potential points of attack you create if hackers discover a weakness," McKinnon says. "Trust is a big issue with plug-ins – and some of them are not what they claim to be – so stick to verified plug-ins from trusted and well-known providers where you can."

Electronic Frontier Foundation's HTTPS Everywhere plug-in is a good starting point. It can't add HTTPS encryption to websites that don't support it but ensures that if it's available, you're using it. Banking websites enable HTTPS by default, but some websites treat it as optional.

When your browser displays the HTTPS padlock, it means you've made an encrypted link to a website. This stops anyone in between snooping on sensitive information such as logins, passwords and banking details. Potential eavesdroppers still know which website you've visited, and the website knows who you are – recording the IP address allocated to your home broadband connection by your internet service provider.

HTTPS foils eavesdroppers but it doesn't stop advertisers and services such as Facebook from tracking you to serve up targeted advertising. This issue is more about privacy than security, just as you might draw the curtains at night even though the front door is locked.

There are browser plug-ins designed to protect your privacy, including NoScript and SafeScript, which block tracking efforts and disable content that can affect your privacy and security, such as JavaScript, Java and Flash. You can tweak the settings for individual websites.

Start with simple plug-ins like Electronic Frontier Foundation's Privacy Badger, which focuses on cross-site tracking; or FlashBlock for keeping Adobe's Flash in check. From here you might step up to more advanced plug-ins like Ghostery and Disconnect.

Search engines also do their fair share of tracking, delivering personalised search results and targeted advertising. If you're concerned about this, try privacy-focused search engines such as DuckDuckGo, Ixquick and StartPage.

Australia's metadata retention scheme and web filtering efforts also concern privacy advocates and civil libertarians. There are ways to cover your tracks online and bypass roadblocks, depending on who you're trying to avoid and why.

It's easy to use a proxy server as the middleman, such as plug-ins like FoxyProxy. Your ISP believes you've only visited the proxy server, not the destination website. The website thinks it was visited by the proxy server rather than a computer using your home IP address.

Proxy servers generally don't support HTTPS encryption, because HTTPS is specifically designed to thwart "man in the middle" attacks. This means your activities are open to eavesdroppers paying particular attention to your online activities.

The next step up is to use a virtual private network, making an encrypted connection to an online VPN server, which then acts as the middleman for all your internet-enabled applications. Your home IP address is hidden and your browsing habits masked, like a proxy server, but traffic between you and the VPN server is safe from prying eyes – including your ISP. You can also use HTTPS for end-to-end encryption with websites.

VPNs and proxy servers are generally enough to protect you against mass surveillance efforts, but it's a different story if you're the subject of targeted surveillance. Dissidents and whistleblowers sometimes turn to the extra protection of TOR, a network of servers that encrypt your internet traffic and bounce it around the world to mask your location. You can use TOR in conjunction with a VPN and HTTPS, but it's still important to read up on how to use it safely.

TOR is overkill unless you genuinely fear authorities will break down your door in the middle of the night, but it's good to know it's there for times when anonymity is paramount.

Plug-ins add security your web browser – Sydney Morning Herald

The lock symbol shows your security is working.

The lock symbol shows your security is working.

Even if you've got nothing to hide, you can tighten your internet privacy and security with some simple precautions.

All browsers have built-in security features but Chrome and Firefox are good because you can lock them down using a wide range of plug-ins designed to enhance privacy, security and anonymity.

Plug-ins are small software downloads that add extra features to your browser, but use them sparingly, warns AVG security awareness director Michael McKinnon.

"The more extensions, plug-ins and add-ons you use in your browser, the more potential points of attack you create if hackers discover a weakness," McKinnon says. "Trust is a big issue with plug-ins – and some of them are not what they claim to be – so stick to verified plug-ins from trusted and well-known providers where you can."

Electronic Frontier Foundation's HTTPS Everywhere plug-in is a good starting point. It can't add HTTPS encryption to websites that don't support it but ensures that if it's available, you're using it. Banking websites enable HTTPS by default, but some websites treat it as optional.

When your browser displays the HTTPS padlock, it means you've made an encrypted link to a website. This stops anyone in between snooping on sensitive information such as logins, passwords and banking details. Potential eavesdroppers still know which website you've visited, and the website knows who you are – recording the IP address allocated to your home broadband connection by your internet service provider.

HTTPS foils eavesdroppers but it doesn't stop advertisers and services such as Facebook from tracking you to serve up targeted advertising. This issue is more about privacy than security, just as you might draw the curtains at night even though the front door is locked.

There are browser plug-ins designed to protect your privacy, including NoScript and SafeScript, which block tracking efforts and disable content that can affect your privacy and security, such as JavaScript, Java and Flash. You can tweak the settings for individual websites.

Start with simple plug-ins like Electronic Frontier Foundation's Privacy Badger, which focuses on cross-site tracking; or FlashBlock for keeping Adobe's Flash in check. From here you might step up to more advanced plug-ins like Ghostery and Disconnect.

Search engines also do their fair share of tracking, delivering personalised search results and targeted advertising. If you're concerned about this, try privacy-focused search engines such as DuckDuckGo, Ixquick and StartPage.

Australia's metadata retention scheme and web filtering efforts also concern privacy advocates and civil libertarians. There are ways to cover your tracks online and bypass roadblocks, depending on who you're trying to avoid and why.

It's easy to use a proxy server as the middleman, such as plug-ins like FoxyProxy. Your ISP believes you've only visited the proxy server, not the destination website. The website thinks it was visited by the proxy server rather than a computer using your home IP address.

Proxy servers generally don't support HTTPS encryption, because HTTPS is specifically designed to thwart "man in the middle" attacks. This means your activities are open to eavesdroppers paying particular attention to your online activities.

The next step up is to use a virtual private network, making an encrypted connection to an online VPN server, which then acts as the middleman for all your internet-enabled applications. Your home IP address is hidden and your browsing habits masked, like a proxy server, but traffic between you and the VPN server is safe from prying eyes – including your ISP. You can also use HTTPS for end-to-end encryption with websites.

VPNs and proxy servers are generally enough to protect you against mass surveillance efforts, but it's a different story if you're the subject of targeted surveillance. Dissidents and whistleblowers sometimes turn to the extra protection of TOR, a network of servers that encrypt your internet traffic and bounce it around the world to mask your location. You can use TOR in conjunction with a VPN and HTTPS, but it's still important to read up on how to use it safely.

TOR is overkill unless you genuinely fear authorities will break down your door in the middle of the night, but it's good to know it's there for times when anonymity is paramount.

Why tools like Docker, Vagrant, and Ansible are hotter than ever – opensource.com

The complexity of application stacks keeps going up. Way, way up. Application stacks have always been complicated, but never like this. There are so many services, so many tools, so much more compute power available, so many new techniques to try, and always the desire, and the pressure, to solve problems in newer and cooler and more elegant ways. With so many toys to play with, and more coming every day, the toy chest struggles to contain them all.

If you're not familiar with stackshare.io, have a look at it. It's a great resource to see which pieces companies are using to build their applications. In addition to being useful, it also can be pretty entertaining.

Spend a few minutes browsing through some of the stacks out there and you'll see that some of the technology collections people have assembled are fascinating. Here's an example I particularly like: (deep breath) EC2 S3 Qubole MongoDB Memecached Redis Django Hadoop nginx Cassandra MySQL Google Analytics SendGrid Route53 Testdroid Varnish Zookeeper.

So that's web server, web application server, caching proxy server, discovery service, a few services-as-a-service, and six "databases" of various flavors and functions. (All of it either open source or proprietary service, of course. There tends to be very little in between anymore.)

It's highly unlikely that anyone ever stood in front of a whiteboard and wrote WE NEED SIX DATABASES!!! with a purple dry erase pen, but that's how things happen when your infrastructure expands rapidly to meet business demand. A developer decides that a new tool is best, rightly or wrongly, and that tool makes its way into production. At that moment, the cool new tool instantly becomes a legacy application, and you have to deal with it until you refactor it (ha!) or until you quit to go do something else and leave the next poor sucker to deal with it.

So how can developers possibly cope with all of this complexity? Better than one might expect, as it turns out.

That awesome nextgen location-aware online combo gambling/dating/sharing economy platform is going to require a lot of different services and components. But every grand plan has a simple beginning, and every component of any ultrascalable mega-solution starts its life as a few chunks of code somewhere. For most teams, that somewhere is a few humble developer laptops, and a git repository to bind them.

We talk about the cloud revolution, but we tend to talk less about the laptop revolution. The developer laptop of today, combined with advances in virtualization and containerization, now allow complex multi-system environments to be fully modeled on a laptop. Multiple "machines" can now be a safe default, because these multiple, separate "machines" can all be trivially instantiated on a laptop.

The upshot: The development environment for a complex, multisystem application stack can now be reliably and repeatably installed on a single laptop, and changes to any of the environment, or all of the environment, can be easily shared among the whole team, so that everyone can rebuild identical environments quickly. For example, ceph-ansible is a tool to deploy and test a multi-node Ceph cluster on a laptop, using multiple VMs, built by Vagrant and orchestrated by Ansible, all with a single command: vagrant up. Ceph developers are using this tool right now.

This kind of complex multi-node deployment is already becoming commonplace, and it means that modeling the relationships between machines is now just as important as managing what's on those individual machines.

Docker and Vagrant are successful because they are two simple ways of saying, "This is what's on this machine, and here's how to start it." Ansible is successful with both because it's a simple way of saying, "This is how these machines interact, and here's how to start them." Together, they allow developers to build complex multi-machine environments, in a way that allows them to be described and rebuilt easily.

It's often said that DevOps, at its heart, is a conversation. This may be true, but it's a conversation that's most successful when everyone speaks the same language. Vagrant, Docker, and Ansible are seeing success because they allow people to speak the same languages of modeling and deployment.

Easy
DevOps

This article is part of the Easy DevOps column coordinated by Greg Dekoenigsberg. Share your stories and advice that helps to make DevOps practical—along with the tools, processes, culture, successes and glorious/inglorious failures from your experience by contacting us at [email protected]

Meet TunnelBear, the gorgeous VPN app that wants to bring online privacy to … – VentureBeat

Virtual private networks, or VPNs for short, have emerged as key tools in the battle for online privacy. This is a battle Canada-based TunnelBear has been helping with over the past few years with a cross-platform app that shields your location and identity on the web.

Today, TunnelBear is bringing its encryption technology to Google’s Chrome browser with a new lightweight extension that lets you flip your browsing into anonymous mode in seconds.

Strictly speaking, TunnelBear for Chrome isn’t a VPN, though it does offer VPN-style features. The new Chrome app is actually an encrypted proxy, which means it’s limited to activity within your browser rather than cloaking all activity on your machine — so if you want all Internet activity to be shielded, with encryption taking place when the data leaves the computer, then TunnelBear’s Windows or Mac app is what you’re after.

TunnelBear for Chrome uses Google Chrome browser’s encryption, AES 128-bit, whereas its VPN products adopt a stronger AES-256 encryption.

Meet TunnelBear

Available for Mac, Windows, Android, and iOS, TunnelBear has gained a reputation as one of the easiest, most user-friendly VPNs, amassing north of five million users across 179 countries since its inception in 2011.

The Toronto-headquartered company now has 18 employees — mostly developers and designers — and is entirely self-funded. TunnelBear is also profitable, the company tells VentureBeat, using a simple but effective means of monetizing and marketing at the same time.

On the free plan, you receive 500MB of data per month to play with, which will get you pretty far if it’s simply emails and general Web browsing. But if you’re streaming video, then it would probably garner you around 45 minutes.

However, users can “buy” an extra 1GB worth of data simply by tweeting out a promotional message on behalf of TunnelBear.

If you’re a dedicated anonymous Internet user, you can commit to a monthly installment of $4.99 which gets you “unlimited tunnelling” on 3 devices. Or you can pay $49.99 for the year and get the same thing, while saving 17 percent off the monthly equivalent cost.

So who is using TunnelBear, and what, exactly, are they using it for?

The VPN debate

It’s true that people use VPNs to circumvent geo-restricted content. So, someone in the U.S. or France or Zimbabwe could crank up TunnelBear to watch BBC iPlayer, an online TV catchup service normally reserved for British TV licence fee-payers. And such circumventions have caused tensions between some of the big online entertainment companies.

Last year, it emerged that Sony might just be a little hacked off with Netflix for not being tough enough on those who use VPNs from around the world to access its content, even though they still have to pay to use it.

Shortly after, reports emerged via Reddit that some VPN services no longer worked with Netflix, though Netflix denied it was doing anything different from what it normally did to crack down on people channeling in using VPNs and other similar workarounds.

Though Netflix users are only allowed to watch the content that’s available in their geographic location according to its own Terms of Use, it’s generally accepted that using VPNs isn’t illegal in itself. That said, Netflix would likely be within its rights to close an account if it suspected someone was using a VPN.

In an interview with VentureBeat, TunnelBear cofounder Ryan Dochuk says that his company has faced no external pressure or door-knocking from Hollywood or anywhere else regarding its VPN services. “We haven’t encountered any negative feedback about TunnelBear — it really hasn’t been a focus of TunnelBear,” he said. “We’ve never been contacted by any content providers.”

While he says that the company doesn’t actively monitor what TunnelBear is used for, citing feedback from the users he adds that the main use-case for TunnelBear has been privacy-related. “We also have a large number of users in censored countries which use TunnelBear to connect to services like Twitter, Facebook and YouTube,” he added.

And that is a key point here. VPNs serve as vital tools for those who live in strict regimes where access to online services are routinely blocked. Last year, for example, Turkey banned Twitter after allegations of government corruption circulated through the social network. The upshot? VPN uptake went through the roof.

The market

TunnelBear operates in an increasingly competitive space with options aplenty to protect your location and identity online. Perhaps the most well-known VPN provider out there is Hotspot Shield, though its free version is supported by ads and it doesn’t have a browser-based version.

Also, TunnelBear lets you “tunnel to” more locations — Canada, U.S., U.K., Germany, Japan, France, Netherlands, Italy, Ireland, Sweden, Switzerland, Spain, Singapore​, and Australia. Hotspot Shield is limited to the U.S., U.K, Australia, Japan, Canada, Hong Kong, China, India, and Germany.

Then there’s ZenMate, a Berlin-based startup that has hitherto pitched its main differentiating factor as being its browser-only status — it offers VPN-like features packed into plugins for most of the main browsers.

Now that TunnelBear has a browser extension too, it offers the best of all worlds. You can have it permanently enabled in Chrome to shield your Internet activity, but then all your other PC-based online activity remains normal. This saves you from constantly having to switch VPN settings on and off.

Perhaps one more factor in TunnelBear’s armory is its charming tunneling bear animations that permeate the app. Sure, some may argue that they’re gimmicky, but they are fun and perhaps serve to ease a new user into the VPN experience.

“There are plenty of VPN services out there, but they tend to be targeted at technical users,” explained Dochuk. “Our apps have always focused on just making our service fun, simple, and approachable for everyone. It’s all about unlocking the benefits of VPNs for the average person.”

Arriving for Chrome is also an easy way for TunnelBear to bring its technology to more platforms, given that the browser is available for Linux and Chromebooks. The company says that it plans to support additional browsers in the future, including Safari and Firefox.

VentureBeat’s VB Insight team is studying marketing and personalization... Chime in here, and we’ll share the results.

Proxy Browser – ZDNet

When you are surfing the internet from the comfort of your own home, you can access to any site on the web without any restrictions. but this is not the case when you are at school or at work place. there are certain web pages that are blocked from the usage because they are considered as distractions and not adapted for school.This doesnt mean that if you are at school or at work place and you are restricted from accessing certain sites you will never be able to surf them. by using proxy browser application you can browse all websites easily and anonymously. because our proxy server provide you fast and highly anonymous internet surfing which hides your identity and allows you unblock all restricted websites.Proxy Browser Applications is built to help user like you to unblock the websites blocked by a specific networks and also to unblock the sites blocked in the country and to access to unlimited network , this app can change your IP address to one of our IPs in other countries to browse the web privately & anonymously. With our free proxy server, you can browse the web securely knowing that your privacy is completely protected. Browsing the web through our server will mask your ip with our ip so you will remain anonymous.In addition to the anonymity, you will also have access to blocked sites with our service. If you happen to be at work or at school you will enjoy access to social places like myspace, facebook, twitter and pinterest. These sites are usually unaccessible without services like us. So enjoy your stay and browse the web safely!Enjoy using our web proxy server, we are Fast and Secure proxy, we allow you to bypass restricted sites as you Want, unblocking any website! we are free, secure and simple to use (Enter the website you want, and click "Go").- 100% compatible with Facebook, Youtube and Twitter.- Free proxy unblock sites and surf anonymously.- Unblock all blocked websites .- Unblock parental control.- Surf the Internet incognito with a hidden IP address.- Modifiable cookies.- No browsing history.Content rating: Everyone

Price0LicenseFreeFile Size2.85 MBVersion1.4.0Operating System Android System RequirementsCompatible with 2.3.3 and above.

Proxy Browser – ZDNet

When you are surfing the internet from the comfort of your own home, you can access to any site on the web without any restrictions. but this is not the case when you are at school or at work place. there are certain web pages that are blocked from the usage because they are considered as distractions and not adapted for school.This doesnt mean that if you are at school or at work place and you are restricted from accessing certain sites you will never be able to surf them. by using proxy browser application you can browse all websites easily and anonymously. because our proxy server provide you fast and highly anonymous internet surfing which hides your identity and allows you unblock all restricted websites.Proxy Browser Applications is built to help user like you to unblock the websites blocked by a specific networks and also to unblock the sites blocked in the country and to access to unlimited network , this app can change your IP address to one of our IPs in other countries to browse the web privately & anonymously. With our free proxy server, you can browse the web securely knowing that your privacy is completely protected. Browsing the web through our server will mask your ip with our ip so you will remain anonymous.In addition to the anonymity, you will also have access to blocked sites with our service. If you happen to be at work or at school you will enjoy access to social places like myspace, facebook, twitter and pinterest. These sites are usually unaccessible without services like us. So enjoy your stay and browse the web safely!Enjoy using our web proxy server, we are Fast and Secure proxy, we allow you to bypass restricted sites as you Want, unblocking any website! we are free, secure and simple to use (Enter the website you want, and click "Go").- 100% compatible with Facebook, Youtube and Twitter.- Free proxy unblock sites and surf anonymously.- Unblock all blocked websites .- Unblock parental control.- Surf the Internet incognito with a hidden IP address.- Modifiable cookies.- No browsing history.Content rating: Everyone

Price0LicenseFreeFile Size2.85 MBVersion1.4.0Operating System Android System RequirementsCompatible with 2.3.3 and above.